30 November 2016

Are Shot Glasses an Appropriate Gift for Graduation?


Within a certain mindset, shot glasses would make a wonderful Graduation gift, wouldn't they? Bongs and water pipes would be a little too ostentatious, don't you agree? And a syringe would be well beyond the fringe....
*****
Shot glasses embossed "Congratulations Teddy - 2012" were the talk amongst all of Teddy's friends that year, especially with a crisp 100 dollar bill rolled up inside each one of them. Celebrate! Celebrate mostly, mainly and almost always denotes Alcohol.  Does it really matter whether it was a high school or college graduation?
How about a kindergarten graduation? (Teach them to drink before they can think?)
I'm being intentionally ridiculous now.
My point is that alcohol is thoroughly entrenched in our culture. It's legal and it's not going away anytime soon. But I'm not advocating another Prohibition. I am happy for all the social drinkers of the world.
But I am not one of them....
*****
"Alcohol is my poison, my prison. A brick wall, a trap door, a cancer, a bad joke, an empty bottle, an excuse, a leaky faucet, a loan shark, a broken promise, a cracked mirror, an earthquake, an avalanche, a train wreck, a recurring nightmare.
Alcohol is my insanity."
*****
I would have loved a pair of shot glasses as a graduation gift from college in 1972. Especially with the hundred dollars rolled up within each. But the symbol behind the shot glasses would have meant more to me. I would have clutched them more closely. They would represent freedom and flights of fancy. The money would have been gone in a few days, but my grip on the shot glasses would almost be as strong as the grip that alcohol already had on me by then....
*****
"There was a time when I was not there, but I did not know it yet. I would drink to forget, forgetting what I did not know. Not yet. I did not know yet. Where was I then, when I was not there? For years I lived somewhere between myself and the next drink. I would drink to forget what I could not think, halfway to nowhere and another drink. I was grieving and I did not know it. Someone was dying, but I could not feel it, feel my own dying. I could not own it because it owned me. Denial is so hard to feel, yet, there it is, standing next to you. You: Halfway to nowhere and another drink."
*****
I probably would have blushed if I'd been given a pair of shot glasses for my high school graduation, Class of '68. In our basement was a little bar that my father constructed out of an old door as the bar's surface. A table lamp stood on the one corner of the bar. It was shaped to resemble an old-fashioned gas streetlight. A ceramic bum, drunk and clutching a bottle was wrapped around the ceramic lamp pole.
My family possessed two antique shot glasses with hand-painted swallows flying across the miniature surface of each, passed down the generations. Each had a caption that read "Just a Swallow." Oh, how I would have loved them. Twenty years after graduation from high school, "Just a Swallow" was beyond my imagination....
*****
"When I reached a certain level of intoxication, I was at my peak. Not before. Not after. And the duration of my peak performance diminished as my disease progressed. I was a lousy pool player until I had enough drinks in me. I needed so many drinks to function at my physical best. At some point, the new normal was drunk and it was a necessity.
1955: Rosa Parks boards a bus. I'm five years old. Alcohol sits next to me, waiting patiently for me to pick up my first drink."
*****
... Had I been given a gift of two shot glasses with the age-appropriate penny placed on the bottom of each for my graduation from kindergarten, I would have played with them, counting the pennies over and over until they were hot in my hands.
I would have played with them and I would have been burned and I was burned and I am still burning, in my memory at least. Sober today, I am still healing from the burns. I am healing and I continue to heal. Will continue. I live fully in recovery today. Fully.
*****
Teddy is dead. Remember Teddy, class of 2012? Shot glasses and hundred dollar bills, his graduation gift. Death by alcohol and a combination of other drugs. All the money in the world won't bring him back now.
*****
Be careful what you Gift for....
Not everyone is a social drinker.
I'm just saying....



*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery
*****
The passages above in quotes are excerpted from All Drinking Aside:  The Destruction, Deconstruction & Reconstruction of an Alcoholic Animal , an Autobiographical Fiction by Jim Anders, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4

27 November 2016

Can this Alcoholic in Recovery be Trained to Become a Social Drinker?


"It doesn't matter how you cut the cake: It's still a cake. And I'm an alcoholic, straight or iced...."
*****
Addiction changes everything.
Despite 12+ years of continuous sobriety, I cannot be convinced that I could somehow be trained to be a social drinker. The risks are too great. The potential consequences, too devastating. Besides, truly, this sober life fits me fine. Like it was always meant to be.
My sober satisfaction will not to be toyed with.
A path forward, my path forward, precludes alcohol.
*****
What could fill the absence that only alcohol once filled?
Recovery fills the centers in this box of chocolates.
Addiction's spell is the deception of being on fulfillment's edge. In the unreality of addiction you will turn left at every intersection. A thousand left hand turns - the spring is wound too tight, another drink in hand. The insane watch stops. Or breaks. Too tight.
Ask a rat.
The rat is dead. Killed by left, left, left. Insanity ensued and I was screwed.
This is why I think I cannot drink. It leads me here, a cul-de-sac of infinite zeros and one too many left hand turns.
*****
More alcohol gave "the illusion of the same high. But it was not the same high. Could not be the same high. Addiction takes what is lost out of the equation to give the appearance, the trompe d'oeuil of sameness. But it is never the same high that is achieved because the highway of more becomes littered with loss. The equation does not factor in loss because the equation is owned by the addiction and not by the dispossessed.
Comfort should be for the dying, yet, there is, in the end, no comfort in this. Oblivion is not comfort. Life obstructed. Construct a new life with what's left, Jim. Jim. What will become of him? A simple death unencumbered by alcohol. Let whatever causes his death be some single cause. Not alcohol. No, not that. Please, not that for him. Give him not that...."
*****
Yes, my behavior was observed. But I did not know for years how others really saw me. I didn't hear the social drinkers' warning to slow down and would not heed them when I could no longer hide my addiction, my ability to control. Blackout drinking that at times could last for days. Right up to the solitary end of my drinking, no one believed my lies were not really lies, just addictive self-deception and false promises.
Still. somehow, some way, finally, I did get and stay sober.
Finally.
That madhouse ended.
This here and now will end my days for now.
*****
To any and all who think that I could somehow be convinced that I could be trained to be a social drinker, I would say this: You have not been there. You do not realize the gift that recovery is to me and the hell that my addiction was.
Not me, I say.
Not today.
Find another rat in another day.
My recovery will not be deposed.
Not today.
No way.
Never was.
Never way.


*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery
*****
The passage above in quotes is excerpted from All Drinking Aside:  The Destruction, Deconstruction & Reconstruction of an Alcoholic Animal , an Autobiographical Fiction by Jim Anders, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4


25 November 2016

not THAT A.D.D...., THIS one....


NOT Attention Deficit Disorder, characterized by having difficulty paying attention, being hyperactive and exhibiting impulsive behavior. I'm talking about Alcohol Deficit Disorder, an attention-grabbing acronym for alcoholism. Where it took me. What it did to me.
*****
Now what? What next? Where?
*****
"To try to tell the story of my life, I see there is no story to tell, just episodes united by the disease of alcoholism. Selective recall. I doubt hypnosis would reveal much more of note as most memories were never formed in the first place during my nearly daily blackouts. Artificial excitement, emotions raised and lowered by drugs and alcohol. Opportunities pursued drunkenly or not at all.
Sometimes I wished I could stop, but I never thought I could stop drinking. Half of my Tower of Babel  was my alcohol-induced inability to understand A.D.D. (Alcohol Deficit Disorder). 'I'll gladly pay you Tuesday to stop my alcohol deficit today.'"
*****
Perpetual taking. That's what alcohol did to me. And me, all the time, thinking it added to my creativity, despite the illegibly scribbled notes I might have woken up to. In no way did alcohol expand my vision, actually or metaphorically. Like a horse wearing blinders, I saw only the road ahead and the road ahead contained only the next drink.
Always in a state of alcohol deficit, the drink in hand, never enough.
Of course, that was never my intention. Alcohol changes intentions into a wide arc that circles back upon itself, complete only in the next drink, the illusion of the next drink.
*****
The continuous undulation of a complete, fulfilling and utter presence in this moment.
Alcohol could give not give me that.
Focused attention on the spectacle of an ordinary life.
Alcohol would not give me that.
The wind blows over the dunes on the beach beneath me, crystalline sand blowing my way and the ocean waves singularly and together meet and define the shoreline.
Alcohol did not want to give me that.
*****
Abundance, satisfaction, the simple perfection of life as it is.
The order of life, imperfect, perceptible in recovery.
*****
My Alcohol Deficit Disorder is DEAD.
Recovery uncovers reality, minus the unreality of addiction.
Subtract alcohol
ADD Recovery.
Stand back.
Live.

*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery
*****

The passages above in quotes are excerpted from All Drinking Aside, an Autobiographical Fiction by Jim Anders, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4

21 November 2016

"Didn't You Used To Be Somebody?"


A year or two before I finally hit what some would call my alcoholic bottom, sitting on a barstool all rummy-eyed, someone actually asked me "Didn't you used to be somebody?"
I guess I had become the shell of the man I once had been, too oblivious to respond.
It didn't seem to matter anymore.
"Didn't you used to be somebody?" More of a statement than a question, really.
*****
"I didn't know then that I was very near finding some bottom, one bottom, a bottom. But I know now that what I need to do is to move forward and to build on whatever little life I have left....
*****
"NEWSFLASH: Cocaine sped me to my bottom. The more cocaine I took, the more alcohol I could drink. The two substances fed off each other, a feeding frenzy, my brain being the main course. Already plummeting well enough on my own, cocaine and other dry goods sped the process....
*****
"For me, Alcohol, in combination with any and many other drugs, was the Quicker Fucker-Upper (Sorry, Bounty Paper Towels). Cocaine sped me to my bottom.... Today I am grateful for everything that sped me to hit bottom. Everything."
*****
With each passing sober year (now a dozen years clean and sober), I look back on my memory of being asked that timeless "Didn't you used to be somebody" question and I am another memory of a memory separated from it. I felt nothing slouching on the barstool in that short encounter, but my memory of it has changed with time, too, an accumulation of sober days healing that insult which was also a fact.
*****
I often wonder if that same guy, years later, ever had another person ask him the very same question.
Another anonymous encounter that might occur before his sobriety is found.
Why didn't I just answer, "Yes, I once was somebody"?
Perhaps he'd have bought me another drink and like my cocaine and other substances, he'd have helped speed me to hit bottom before finally finding recovery.
Perhaps....
*****
Cheers, Gentle Reader, a Sparkling Cider sober toast to you!


*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery
*****

The passages above in quotes are excerpted from All Drinking Aside, an Autobiographical Fiction by Jim Anders, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4

20 November 2016

A Gift of Recovery


Every religion the world over has traditions of gift-giving, so no matter your religion or spirituality, get in the spirit of gift-giving. Consider "All Drinking Aside" as an appropriate gift for friends and relations in recovery or who know someone who is, or should be, in recovery
But don't take my word for it.
Flesh out the Reader Reviews here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
or
Delve into the flavor and texture of my writing style and content excerpted in Niume here:


A Wish for a Clean & Sober Season.
More to Come.
Strive On!



19 November 2016

An OPEN POST to Addicts: We Are "These People..."


The stigma of alcoholism and addiction and the hatred and ignorance behind it have forced many of us to hide our addictions behind walls of denial. We hid them, sometimes quite cleverly (a chef I once worked with hid his bottle at work in the toilet tank).

"These people need to stop."

And when we finally got clean and sober, we met behind closed doors because some of us had to protect our dirty, little secret.

"These people are the lowest of the low."

*****
I want to stop right here. This will have to be a post finished by us. WE ARE THESE PEOPLE.

*****
BUT... the scab that is the stigma of addiction will not heal by retaliation. A well-placed "Fuck You!" simply won't do. The stigma of addiction is slowly being undone, unravelled by science and kindness, a few kind words.
WE and THEY, US and THEM, will one day be ALL of US. The Common Good will eventually triumph. I've seen change for the better in my own lifetime.

*****
We could all add to statements that start with "THESE PEOPLE..." and I encourage you to add your own in the comments you may make at the end of my post.
We need to air them so that they may then become part of our past as we move forward.

*****
"These people don't deserve... "
"These people can't... ""These people won't..."

*****
12 years sober and I continue to heal.

*****
Good News (Which is half of why I started writing my post today in the first place. Shared Courage is the other half)!

Click on the links below!

*****

Landmark Surgeon General Report Tackles Addiction:
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/872089
& this
The surgeon general just issued a report calling addiction what it is - a brain disease:
http://www.sciencealert.com/the-surgeon-general-has-issued-a-report-calling-addiction-a-brain-disease
& this
Surgeon general: 1 in 7 in USA will face substance addiction
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2016/11/17/surgeon-general-1-7-us-face-substance-addiction/93993474/

*****

If you got this far, thanks for letting me get SOME of this off my chest!

*****
*****
*****
Jim Anders is the author of All Drinking Aside, an Autobiographical Fiction, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4


17 November 2016

Alcohol-Driven Eating Disorder


I'm sure I'm not alone in this and paid no particular attention to it at the time, but multiple mutations occurred over the course of my addiction to alcohol. The progress, a steep decline with short periods of better than worse control, continued for decades. One or two good days would sustain my hope that I would and could get a handle on it (tomorrow, maybe tomorrow, not yet. No, not yet). 

*****
Food.

*****

Somehow my relationship with food changed:

"Thirty years later I finally see the irony. By the time I had my Friday night TV news segment, 'Time to Dine,' my days of 'dining' were clearly already over. This raging alcoholic did not 'dine' anymore at all by that time. I only ate after I was already fucked up.... Food screwed with my 'alcohol delivery system.' Most of the time I did not eat a single bite until I had already administered the proper dosage of alcohol, unencumbered by food. This was normal. On an empty stomach I could more easily control my intake. I had power over my alcohol and it was manageable. That, of course, was one of alcohol's biggest lies, the illusion of control...."

*****
My relationship with every single thing changed (including my relationship with relationships). Yes, alcohol changed everything until it was the only thing. Until it was the no-thing, like the black holes described by scientists where the gravitational force is so strong that light cannot escape. Yes, alcohol was that no-thing.

*****
Food, like the very air we must breathe to live, took a back seat to alcohol for me.
Something is very, very wrong when everything is wrong.
There can be no doubt of this one thing. Today, I am Sober & Strong.

Strive On!



*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery

*****

The passage above in quotes is excerpted from All Drinking Aside, an Autobiographical Fiction by Jim Anders, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4


Pills for everything except for who I am.


That is a sad state of affairs to once have felt that I wanted a pill to change who I was, who I must have been. Situational depression might well have been what it was when I first hit bottom in 1996 at the age of 46, 30 years and 50,000 drinks after my first intoxication.
But it was more than that. More than that situation of having hit bottom that first time. Like a snowball rolling down a hill, accumulating as it rolled, I became an avalanche. "An avalanche and then forgetful snow. This is how I would die. Death by alcohol. It would seem to comfort as it killed."
*****
But I did not die and there was no pill for who I was.
*****
"Fired from my first job sober. Ain't that cute? Over-medicated on prescription anti-depressants. Have they no anti-self pity prescriptions? What must I do to not feel screwed? Emotional brick walls. Pills for everything except for who I am. The self as brick wall and not knowing which side you're on. No pill for that....
What is left when nothing's left?
A drink. A cigarette. Ten thousand more...."
*****
Recovery is my medication today....
Last night was my first drunk dream in over 12 years where I was not the one drunk in the dream. I was sober. Others in that dream were drunk and the sober, new, 12-year sober Jim had to deal with them.
... Recovery evolves.
*****
"Pills for everything except for who I am." How far away that seems.
Living to dream. Living the dream.
I am alive and accept now who I am.



*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery
*****
Passages in quotes are excerpted from All Drinking Aside, an Autobiographical Fiction by Jim Anders, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4


15 November 2016

Shall We Call This One "Alcoholics Ironic"?


A horse walks into a bar and the bartender queries, "Hey, Fella, why the long face?

This short joke, which I particularly like, reminds me of speculation about addiction's role in loss of humor in general and lack of empathy in particular.
It has been suggested by some that alcoholics and addicts have less empathy than the population-at-large partly due to the fact that their focus is on the next drink or drug and away from connecting emotionally with others in the present.

Doesn't the bartender realize he's about to serve a drink to a horse?
Is the bartender an alcoholic who has severed his connection with reality?
Can a horse drink like a fish?

This joke leaves these and other questions unresolved, leaving the humor to be found in the mind of the one told it. Isn't it ironic?

***** 

"Christ, when I was drinking, I couldn't remember anyone's name because I was always drunk. But now that I'm sober, it seems everyone wants to remain anonymous. Alcoholics Anonymous! Now, there's an irony. Wanting to remain anonymous sober and not being able to remember anyone's name when drunk!..."

*****

THAT IS ironic! 
Seriously, folks, I did lose my sense of humor as my life in active addiction dissolved in front of me. 
I had a long face.
The joke is on addiction. The laughter is in recovery.

*****

If you got this far after I cracked my "a horse walks into a bar" joke, I hope you at least cracked a smile.
Have a Good :-) Day, Y'All!




*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery
*****
This post was written by Jim Anders, author of All Drinking Aside, an Autobiographical Fiction, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4

10 November 2016

CONTROL: Desire, Illusion & Loss


The quality of street drugs is NOT controlled. People die every day and hour from ingesting, snorting and shooting up different substances than what they presume they had just purchased.
Alcohol is a controlled substance. In my home state, Pennsylvania, liquor is sold by the state and monitored by a Liquor Control Board. You are certain of the quality and purity of every substance you purchase.

So alcohol is safer than street drugs, right?

Absolutely.

Except for me. It's not safe for me. Presumably never was. A long, hard lesson to be learned. A 30-year look back on my drinking experience has proven to me beyond doubt that it is not safe for me to drink under any circumstances or conditions. Ever. No matter how many decades between sips. Alcoholism and its attendant consequences have been progressive for me. My life always has always gotten progressively worse each and every time I have picked up a drink.

No matter the purity and proof of the alcohol I might ingest, it's me who is out of control when I drink. I'm a blackout drinker who continues to drink, well after my ability to form memories has evaporated. My brain's desire for all else dissipates. Alcohol replaces what alcohol displaces. Illusion, delusion and insanity ensue. The only gain is loss. And loss is all.
After years of sustained sobriety, all street drugs, alcohol and prescription drugs (except as prescribed by a doctor) are off my Wish List, Bucket List and a list of other lists. With no illusion of control over addictive substances, my recovery continues to flourish in their absence. 


*****
#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery
*****
This post was written by Jim Anders, author of All Drinking Aside, an Autobiographical Fiction, linked here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Visit his Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056 
& find his Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4


"Whoa" means nothing to a Swedish horse.

(Stacy at onesentence dot org)
Below is my reaction to Stacy's statement -

*****

There is a certain internal logic to the Language of Addiction.
"Would you like one for the road?" certainly means have so many more that you won't be able to find your way home and won't know where you are when you wake up.
"I suppose one more certainly can't hurt" means better make it a double.
And the next day, when you finally find your way home, "I'll never do it again, I promise" means you will do it again and probably the very next night.
The world thinks you're having your way, but really, addiction is having its way with you.
You know, of course, exactly what I mean because you know "'Whoa' means nothing to a Swedish horse" or a lush like me, if you are much like me.
Disgust, contempt, hatred all around. Internal, external and in between.
I lost count how many times I hated myself. No clue that it was alcohol I hated. Hated what it did to me. Hated that I could not do without.

The Logic of Addiction is Insanity upon the back of a runaway Swedish horse.


Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056
Find Recovery Tweets here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4
Blog out here: http://alldrinkingaside.com
Jim Anders is the author of All Drinking Aside, available here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO


08 November 2016

Insanity's Bouquet


"Insanity's bouquet is not of different colored roses, or different flowers of various sorts. It's a bouquet of weapons, destruction, defense and offense, all wrapped in lies and gin-soaked tears, false laughter, hollowed-out bones. This is insanity's bouquet. Hot steel, cold steel, nothing. I will fill the black holes of my memory with a retrained brain. Live my way sober or lie my way drunk, powerless victim or sober victor. One foot in front of the other...."

#Alcoholism #Addiction #Recovery

(from Chapter 72 "Insanity's Bouquet," All Drinking Aside)
More A.D.A. info here: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO
Follow Twitter here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4
Blog out here: http://alldrinkingaside.com
Niume Recovery page here: https://niume.com/pages/profile/?userID=26056





07 November 2016

My Life When Full Was Empty


Below, a short excerpt from my book, followed by my reaction today:

    "Only twice did I ever stand outside a liquor store waiting for it to open, literally sweating those last few minutes before the doors finally opened. Open, damn it! I measured my life in pints instead of hours. Only twice I stood outside waiting. But it could have been (and really was) 10,000 days."

This was my life at that time. Waiting for a liquor store to open merely emblematic of living in addiction. Even when the glass was full, that aching feeling that that would not, could not be enough, made even the fullest of fullest glasses an empty life.
Anyone not yet sober for their first time cannot understand, as I could not, that the most optimistic attitude will eventually be broken by addiction. It's like living someone else's life because your life is not your own. 
Until I put down the fullest glass, it would remain for me always less than empty.

Excerpt (in quotation marks) 
from All Drinking Aside: http://amzn.to/1bX6JyO

Follow Twitter here: http://twitter.com/JimAnders4

Blog out here: http://alldrinkingaside.com


06 November 2016

Nature / Nurture Foretold?


    "When I reached a certain level of intoxication, I was at my peak. Not before. Not after. And my duration of peak performance diminished as my disease progressed. I was a lousy pool player until I had enough drinks in me. I needed so many drinks to function at my physical best. At some point, the new normal was drunk and it was a necessity. 
    1955- Rosa Parks boards a bus. I'm five years old. Alcohol sits next to me, waiting patiently for me to pick up my first drink."

from All Drinking Aside
Follow Twitter here: 
http://twitter.com/JimAnders4
Blog out here: 


Live! Today! Sunday, 11/06/16

Overcoming Addiction Radio
Noon - 2 P.M (E.S.T.) this &
Every Sunday.

Today I am Blessed 
to be their Guest!

Here's all you need to know to tune in & call in:


Overcoming Addiction Radio airs live EVERY Sunday, from 12-2 pm EST via Cave Radio ~www.caveradiobroadcasting.com , or download the "CaveRadio" mobile app from the Apple iStore, or Google Play.
All Podcasts can be heard via:
https://soundcloud.com/carrie- turcotte/sets/overcoming-addic tion
https://soundcloud.com/cave-r adio-broadcasting/sets/overcom ing-addiction
Overcoming Addiction Radio, Inc. on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/overc omingaddictionradio/
All are welcome to call into the show anytime during the broadcast to share, spread words of encouragement, experience, strength and hope at (313)-879-5059. We encourage listeners to call into the show Sunday 12-2pm EST and be a part of this process of sharing. 
P.S. I will be their Guest on Sunday, November 6th from NOON to 2 P.M. E.S.T..
TUNE IN! Call in. REV UP Your RECOVERY!


05 November 2016

FALL BACK ONE HOUR & RECOVERY FORWARD TW0!!!


Don't forget to set your clocks back one hour tonight &


Remember to listen to Overcoming Addiction Radio for two hours this &

Every Sunday.

REV UP Your RECOVERY on OVERCOMING ADDICTION RADIO
Here's more info:
Overcoming Addiction Radio airs live EVERY Sunday, from 12-2 pm EST via Cave Radio ~www.caveradiobroadcasting.com , or download the "CaveRadio" mobile app from the Apple iStore, or Google Play.
All Podcasts can be heard via:
https://soundcloud.com/carrie- turcotte/sets/overcoming-addic tion
https://soundcloud.com/cave-r adio-broadcasting/sets/overcom ing-addiction
Overcoming Addiction Radio, Inc. on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/overc omingaddictionradio/
All are welcome to call into the show anytime during the broadcast to share, spread words of encouragement, experience, strength and hope at (313)-879-5059. We encourage listeners to call into the show Sunday 12-2pm EST and be a part of this process of sharing. 
P.S. I will be their Guest on Sunday, November 6th from NOON to 2 P.M. E.S.T..
TUNE IN! Call in. REV UP Your RECOVERY!
Don't Get High! ? Call in & say "Hi!"